Showing posts with label Kells House and Gardens. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kells House and Gardens. Show all posts

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Coast, Cliffs and Chocolate. The Iveragh Experience: Killorglin to Ballinskelligs.

The Iveragh Experience

Killorglin to Ballinskelligs. Coast, Cliffs and Chocolate.

A special at Nick's Killorglin
Near Blackstone Bridge
Part Ring of Kerry, part Wild Atlantic Way. Part Ring of Skelligs. Mix them all up and enjoy the trip from Killorglin to Ballinskelligs, with a side visit to the lovely Blackstone Bridge and the Caragh River. 

If you are looking for a place to stay, there is no shortage. But I can heartily recommended the Carrig Country House, a lovely Victorian house on the shore of Carrig Lake; great hospitality and excellent food (including one of the country's best breakfasts). 

Just after one of those breakfasts, we set off on an inland spin, towards Glencar, a pretty place at the foot of the local mountains. If you don't climb, then there are many walks in the area, especially in Lickeen Woods.

Here too is where the Caragh River flows over the black stones that give the bridge its name. It is a picturesque spot and some fishermen were on the backs at the time. Later, we would drive up the narrow road to the Ballaghbeama Pass. It looks bleak on a grey day but splendid when the sun is shining. You can make a U turn at the top or continue on down between the mountains to Sneem.

The Kerry Cliffs
We came back and headed to Killorglin, passing the large statue of King Puck on the bank of the river near the bridge. There is a big car park just off to the right of the one-way (up) main street. We parked there and walked downhill with the church to our left. Then up a slope, again on the left, as a metal bridge loomed overhead. Up on the bridge, the old railway bridge, there are very good views of the River Laune and the road bridge that we just crossed.

Time then for a snack. We were in luck. Had spotted a sign for Jack’s Bakery & Deli, on Bridge Street, and it looked good. We were the last customers! It was just past one o'clock on a Sunday but they were about to close up, having sold out! But they did feed us, a couple of well filled baps (the last of morning's baking) and, as we sat down at the outside tables, a big slice of chocolate cake was added as a bonus! Thanks Jack!

On the Bolus Walk

By the way, if you are in Killorglin of an evening, you might like to try the well known Nick’s or their younger sister next door, Sol y Sombra. Nick's A la Carte prices can be a bit stiff yet one of our starters, Garlic Marinated Pan Seared Prawns with pickled cucumber and a herb vinaigrette, was one of the very best I've come across and worth the €12.50 price tag. You may also find good value in the set menus, including one that offers three courses for €28.00.
Mussel boat

You’ll see Cromane mussels on many a menu locally and the village is close to Killorglin and worth a detour. Here, you’ll see the flat-deck boats used for the purpose. No work though when I called on a Sunday. Would like to have seen them in action as I did in various parts of France, especially in Marennes-Oléron on the west coast.
Skywalker!

The Red Fox Inn seems to be a very popular spot with tourist buses. And, if you have 20 minutes or so to spare, you might be interested in seeing the adjacent Kerry Bog Village (fee) for “a snapshot of Irish life in the 18th and 19th century”. The few bog ponies and the Irish wolfhounds weren't overly animated and there were no mountain goats on our visit. There are a number of cottages, containing lots of interesting everyday memorabilia and, in one, the turf fire is blazing and the room is full of smoke!

On then to Glenbeigh. We took a walk on the nearby beach of Rossbeigh. It was windy and the wind sports enthusiasts were out in force. Didn't do Cahersiveen justice (another day!) as we drove quickly through heading for Renard Point to the south of the town to take the ferry to Valentia Island. No shortage of activities on the island as you may read here …
Bolus Walk
In preparation for your drive on the Skelligs Ring, you might like to visit the Skellig Experience (fee) on Valentia. It has a cafe but the offering is limited and average. Pick up the Skelligs Ring in Portmagee and make a visit to the Kerry Cliffs your first stop. There is a small fee but you get a good walk and a few excellent viewpoints over the impressive cliffs.

Continue to the coast and soon you'll see the signs for the Skelligs Chocolate (no fee). Here, you’ll get a warm welcome and get to sample their various offerings. If it is a working day, you'll see the produce being made. Lots of it for sale of course and I got some Strawberry and Champagne and also a white citrus (lemon and lime) chocolate. And they have the Puffin Cafe here as well. No sandwiches or anything like that. Just a treat for yourself. I enjoyed my tall glass of hot chocolate and a chunk of Rocky Road.
Skelligs Chocolate
Back to the road then, for a short spell. There is a great walk nearby, with views over the bay and the famous Skellig Islands. We drove to the trailhead but didn't have time to do the full walk around Bolus Head (it takes about three hours). But we did enjoy our hour in the sun with the blue sea on one side, the hard fields full of sheep and their lambs on the other.

Old Bog Farm
Kells Garden
Time then to turn around and head for Kells Bay and our final visit. Kells Bay Gardens is one of Ireland’s foremost Victorian Gardens and contains a great selection of southern hemisphere plants. The hairy fern tree plantation is impressive and there are lots of tree carvings around to amuse both kids and adults. The highlight - and it is a new feature - is the Skywalk, a shaky rope bridge over a stream. You’ll need your two hands here, so be careful with that camera.

After all the exercise, you’ll now be thinking about a well deserved dinner in the Lakeside Restaurant at Carrig House!
See also: Visiting Valentia Island
Lovely Dinner at The Lakeside 
Calm and Comfortable at Carrig House